The Herbert Protocol is an information gathering tool to assist the police to find a person living with dementia who has been reported missing as quickly as possible.


Police Scotland have been working in partnership with Scottish Care and Alzheimer Scotland to increase awareness and promote use of the Herbert Protocol and are encouraging people to find out more and pass the information on to anyone that it may be helpful for.


The Herbert Protocol is a nationally recognised scheme supported and endorsed by Police Scotland.  The initiative was first developed by Norfolk Police. It is named after George Herbert, a war veteran of the Normandy landings, who lived with dementia. George Herbert died whilst ‘missing’, trying to find his childhood home.
This can be used for anyone who has a dementia diagnosis and may be at risk of going missing. People living with dementia often have loss of short term memory but can easily recall memories from decades earlier. Sometimes those who are reported missing are attempting to make their way to a place of previous significance to them. 

https://www.scotland.police.uk/what-s-happening/missing-persons/the-herbert-protocol/

The number of surveys returned this year (47) is once again down on previous years (65 in 2017, 55 in 2018 and 55 in 2019) Overall, satisfaction with the service received by service users remains very high (as in previous years), with 96% of respondents being either very satisfied (87%) or fairly satisfied (9%).

This was reflected in the overall grading given by service users, with 68% giving the highest (excellent) grade, 17% very good and 6% good. Only 1 person rated the office as weak.

Service users appear to be very appreciative of both the office staff and the care attendants, with a number of respondents writing complimentary comments. In fact there were no significant critical or negative comments on this occasion.

Some of the comments from service users:

“I find all the carers extremely kind, considerate & very helpful.”

“The Management Team is very helpful & I am very pleased with the service.I feel at ease talking to Carol “

“We could not have managed without the help & support of the Crossroads carers coming in. “

“Makes me feel independent. “

Vaccination and Testing

Staff are now being offered their second vaccination.

These started on Saturday 6th March with 2 further dates scheduled for later in March. We have also received the staff self testing kits.

The staff now self test on a Friday or Saturday and get their results back Sunday or Monday.

This is a once a week test.

Our Care Inspector, Linda, is pleased with the rate of vaccination and testing we have achieved. She has asked me to pass on sincere thanks to all support workers, staff, the management team and the board for continuing the service without interruption and still putting care at the forefront.

  • The Duty of Candour act came into effect on 1stApril 2018. The overall purpose of this is to ensure organisations are open, honest and supportive if there is an unexpected or unintended incident resulting in death or harm, as defined in the Act.
  • Part of the reporting procedure is to openly state how many incidents the duty of candour procedure has applied to each year.
  • We are pleased to report that for the year to 31stMarch 2020 Crossroads had no such incidents.

You can read the regulations in full at : www.legislation.gov.uk/ssi/2018/57/made/data.pdf