Pauline is originally from Yorkshire. She married a Scot and they moved to Creetown in 1990 to be midway between their two families. 

Sadly her husband died in 2000 but she did not want to move back south as she felt at home in the community that she felt sure, would ‘keep an eye’ on her – and so it has proven.

As the years rolled on, Pauline had to go into hospital and on her return home she began receiving support from Crossroads. Originally this was for three visits per day but as she became more able to fend for herself, it was reduced to a morning and a bedtime visit which allow her to continue to live in her own home. 

The key purpose of the visits are to help with Pauline’s support stockings, without which she would be unable to live independently. The care attendants also help with other things which Pauline finds difficult, and are willing to turn their hands to anything she needs. She gets on well with them all, using words like ‘brilliant’ to describe the service they give

She cited instances when the care attendants have gone out of their way to help her, and praised the way the Crossroads care attendants who live in the village arranged to divide it up between them to ensure that everyone was visited and taken care of, when the recent heavy snow hit the area.

Pauline summed up her feelings about Crossroads by saying that she could not do without the service. She looks forward to the care attendants’ visits and enjoys their chat.

We have held a number of informal coffee mornings at various locations in the Machars over the course of the winter, so that service users and carers could meet some of the office staff and Board members.

On this occasion, staff, clients and carers were given the opportunity to have some fun and demonstrate their skill at making lampshades.

Lotioned and potioned, creamed and perfumed,
My Crossroads attendants ensure I am groomed.
Each day starts the same, with good humour and smiles.
I may read my paper or book for a while,
Wait for the postman – or make a few calls,
My telephone friends think I’m rarely alone
As I frequently tell them “you must excuse me –
I’ll talk to you later – someone’s come in!”

Crossroads come alone, or paired, perhaps tripled,
Keep up my spirits, as do a measure
Of sherry, Campari, madeira, Martini!
I hear small talk of rotas and shifts and
Making an entry (but not through a door)
It can only be read in the Red Book of Lore
That’s no work of fiction, it’s true as can be
Come see for yourself – it’s beyond me!

E.P.

TO MANY.. CROSSROADS IS JUST A TV SOAP,
TO SOME AGED AND INFIRM IT OFFERS HOPE,

A BAND OF DEDICATED AND CARING SOULS,
ALL PERFORMING SIMILAR ROLES,

ABOUT THEIR TASKS WITH SMILES AND CHARM,
THEY CARE FOR YOU AND DODGE THE HARM,

THEY CLEAN YOU, DRESS YOU AND THEN THEY COOK,
NEVER KNOWN TO HAVE A SOUR FACED LOOK,

ALWAYS WILLING AND KEEN TO PLEASE,
LITTLE PROBLEMS DEALT WITH EASE,

SO WELL DONE CARERS – PRESENT AND PAST,
WE HOPE YOUR VENTURE WILL LAST AND LAST.

Written by a Service User who wishes to remain anonymous
2015


The most recent Care Inspectorate report (2015)  awarded Crossroads grade 5 (Very good) in all areas examined (quality of care and support, staffing, leadership and management).